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Cancer: it’s a diagnosis we all dread. Finding out that you have cancer can be very distressing, as very few of us are equipped to deal with such major news. We’ve already discussed the most common forms of cancer and their symptoms and treatments in our detailed guide to cancer. Today, we’ll be focusing on what happens after diagnosis and sharing practical tips to help anybody coping with cancer.

What Is Cancer?

Cancer is a medical condition that affects millions of people in the UK every year. Macmillan Cancer Support estimates that, by 2030, 4 million people in the UK will be living with cancer.

Cancer happens when cells in a certain part of the body begin to divide and multiply too much. The rapid growth of these cancerous cells is what causes tumours to form. In some cases, cancer cells can break away from the original site and spread elsewhere in the body.

Coping With Cancer – After Diagnosis

Overall, nearly 1000 people in the UK receive a cancer diagnosis every day. Even if you have been suspecting it for a while, it is never easy to learn that you have cancer. However, outcomes for cancer patients are better than ever before, due to developments in medical technology and increasing knowledge. Regardless, there will be lots of different emotions to contend with after your diagnosis. You might feel anxious, sad, angry, confused, or any number of other things. On the other hand, some cancer patients have reported feeling relieved after their diagnoses, because they may have been waiting a long time to find out what was wrong.

Coping With Cancer - Statistics from Macmillan Cancer Support

Above all else, it is important to acknowledge that all of these feelings are perfectly natural and acceptable. Feelings of shock or denial after your diagnosis will usually get easier to deal with over time. However, feelings of fear, sadness, or loneliness may persist or become harder to handle. If this is the case, there is plenty of help available.

Emotional Support

Your GP can refer you to dedicated services for support with mental health and emotional wellbeing. Generally, talking to the people around you can help you cope with negative feelings. These conversations might be uncomfortable or difficult to start. You might want to talk to people you are very close to, or you might prefer to talk to someone you don’t know very well like a doctor, nurse, psychologist, or counsellor.

Furthermore, there are several support services you can call for for advice, or simply to speak to somebody who will listen. We’ve put together a brief list of phone numbers below:

How To Tell People About Your Diagnosis

First and foremost, remember that you are in control of who you tell about your diagnosis as well as how and when you tell them. Take as much time as you need to process your own emotions until you feel ready to open up to others.

Some professionals recommend making a list of the people you want to tell, putting them in order from those who will be most affected to least affected. Remember that you can share this news in whatever way feels most appropriate for you, whether that’s face-to-face, over the phone, or in a letter or email.

Whoever you choose to tell, it might help to build up to the subject gradually and give them information one piece at a time. This will allow you both to digest what you’re saying and acknowledge how you’re both responding.

You might find it helpful to prepare for a wide range of possible responses from your loved ones. Some people will react to the news with an outpouring of emotion while others will ask lots of questions that you might not have the answers to yet. Some people might even say nothing at all, possibly out of denial or fear of saying the wrong thing.

By all means, take a break if you need to. These conversations will inevitably be difficult, and it’s always okay to tell someone that you need some time.

Coping With Cancer – During Treatment

Side Effects

The side effects of cancer treatment will vary from patient to patient, depending on the treatment they receive. Different drugs can cause different physical, emotional, and psychological side effects, so it’s important to discuss your treatment in detail with your doctor. There are often ways they can help you to reduce or manage your side effects.

Common side effects include:

Cancer Research UK has a detailed guide to coping with cancer treatment and its side effects.

 

Emotional Support

Next, let’s discuss how to deal with the different emotions you might experience as you go through treatment for cancer. Remember that no two people will have exactly the same responses to treatment.

Anxiety – you might feel particularly anxious when you go to the hospital for treatment or check ups. Bringing a loved one with you can help keep you calm. You can also talk to your doctor to get help with anxiety. This help might take the form of talking therapy, counselling, or medication.

Sadness – many people with cancer report that they feel pressure to hide their sadness, but it is totally normal to feel sad about your illness. However, if you are feeling sad all the time and struggling to feel good about anything, you might be experiencing depression. In this case, you should speak to your doctor in order to get the support you need.

Relationship worries – you might worry about the potential toll of your cancer treatment on your relationships with friends and family. Communication is key. Try to make time with your loved ones to talk about how each of you is feeling. Everyone involved can take comfort from being listened to, even if you don’t have answers to all of the questions.

Practical Concerns

Money

Coping with cancer treatment can be difficult for several practical reasons alongside the physical and emotional obstacles. Cancer treatment might impact your ability to work, so your income could be affected. Financial support is available for people with cancer, but most people need advice on where to find it and what benefits they might qualify for. You can speak to Citizens Advice or Jobcentre Plus advisers for help with benefits and government support.

Help At Home

You can access nursing services for medical help at home. A district nurse can visit your home to give medicines or injections among many other important services. Marie Curie nurses can also visit your home to help if you have advanced cancer. This can give your carer(s) a break, which can be help to prevent strain on your relationships.

Social Services

You can choose to refer yourself to your local social services if you would like. A social worker can check that you are receiving all the benefits you are eligible for, look for charity grants you might be entitled to, and arrange any home help you might need while you are coping with cancer. You can contact them yourself or ask your GP to refer you.

Coping With Cancer – After Treatment

You might undergo treatment for a course of weeks or months. At the end of this course of treatment, you will usually have lots of check-ups to make sure everything is going well. Generally speaking, you will have follow-up appointments every few months for the first year after your treatment. Then, as time goes by, you will have fewer check-ups.

When you go back to hospital for these appointments, you might be reminded of the difficult times you have been through. Feelings of fear or anxiety might return before your appointments. However, these check-ups are often reassuring for lots of people.

Making the Most Of Follow-Up Appointments

Once you have finished your course of treatment, you will likely be eager to move on with your life and put your illness behind you. At the same time, it is very important to make the most of your follow-up appointments. Here are some tips, courtesy of Macmillan Cancer Support:

 

The Road To Recovery

The process of recovery can extend long after you can the all clear. It will take time for you to get back to normal, or work out what your new normal will look like. This process can seem very daunting but it’s important not to rush yourself.

Targets

Try setting targets for yourself to build up your progress gradually. Your confidence may have taken a knock over the course of your diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, you should try to challenge yourself to build your confidence back up. If you are nervous about going out and about, challenge yourself to go for a walk with your family or meet a friend for coffee, for example.

Healthy Choices

It’s important to look after your general health after cancer treatment. If you smoke, quitting smoking is without a doubt the healthiest choice you can make. The NHS provides plenty of resources to help those who are trying to quit. In addition, you might have been less active than usual during your treatment, owing to side effects of fatigue and weakness. Now that your treatment is complete, you can start building up to regular physical activity. You should also take care to eat a healthy diet.

Coping With Cancer – Support Groups

Joining a support group can be very helpful for those with cancer, whether you’ve just been diagnosed, you’re undergoing treatment, or you’re already in recovery. Whether you choose to go to meetings in person or join a group online, the chance to speak to other people who understand what you’re going through is a great way to find support and companionship. You can find local groups using the NHS website’s search tool.

During support group meetings, you can talk about any of your experiences, or simply choose to listen if you don’t feel ready to speak. Most groups are available to join free of charge; some will ask for donations or simply charge for refreshments. A support group can also help you find additional services like counselling.

If you are or have been a carer for somebody with cancer, there are also dedicated support groups that you can join.

Above all, support groups help people coping with cancer by offering the chance to connect with others, which can make you feel less lonely or isolated.

To find out more, read our detailed guide to cancer, with information on the symptoms, causes, and treatments for common types of cancer.

Terminal Cancer Support

Cancer mortality rates have been declining for decades and experts predict that they will continue to decrease over the next few years. Cancer Research UK predicts that mortality rates will decrease by 15% in the UK between 2014 and 2035.

However, the fact remains that, sadly, some cases of cancer do still result in death. Receiving a diagnosis of terminal cancer is bound to be very upsetting and you will likely feel a variety of strong emotions. Sharing these feelings with your loved ones can help you to cope and help the people around you to understand. Alternatively, if you don’t feel ready or able to open up to those around you, you can access professional services such as counselling.

Alongside the powerful emotions you will be feeling, there are also some practical issues to bear in mind. First of all, you should consider writing a will. You might want to find a solicitor or will-writing service to help you. Writing a will means you can decide what happens to your money, property, and possessions after you die. You can also specify who you want to look after any children in your care.

You might also want to think about the kind of funeral you would like. Understandably, you might find it upsetting to think about, but some people find it comforting to have their own plans in place. You might want to write down some details such as the music, poems, prayers, or readings you would like to have, a specific church or other venue, and whether you would like to have a burial or a cremation. Making these plans yourself can help you feel in control of things. It can also take some of the organisational and financial responsibility off of your loved ones after you have passed.

Coping With Cancer – A Brighter Future

It is perfectly natural to feel scared or anxious when talking about cancer. When we hear the word ‘cancer’, we tend to assume the worst. However, cancer survival rates in the UK have doubled in the last 40 years. As of 2010, according to Cancer Research UK, 50% of people diagnosed with cancer in England and Wales survive their disease for 10 years or more. Survival rates vary depending on the type of cancer, ranging from 98% for testicular cancer to 1% for pancreatic cancer.

What’s more, treatments are becoming more effective and widely available. There are also more resources than ever to help those coping with cancer, particularly since the invention of the internet.

Medical professionals are working every day to improve our understanding of cancer. Thanks to research, we are closer than ever to understanding how best to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer.

For more information on cancer and other conditions, read our guide to 20 common medical conditions affecting older people.

How We Can Help

If you have been diagnosed with cancer, you might be worried about coping with cancer treatment and its physical side effects. You may be experiencing fatigue, pain, or breathing difficulties for example. If this is the case, you might wish to consider a Lifeline alarm system.

Our life-saving service can give you peace of mind in a distressing time. Having a Lifeline alarm means that you can call for help whenever you need it with just the touch of a button. If, for example, you have a fall and are unable to get up, you can press the button on your alarm pendant. You will be connected immediately to our 24/7 Emergency Response Team, who will assess the situation and arrange for help to be sent to you.

If you would like to find out more about the Lifeline personal alarm service, you can read our quick guide to pendant alarms. You can also call 0800 999 0400 and speak to one of our friendly advisers. Alternatively, if you prefer, fill in our Contact Us form online and we will get in touch with you as soon as possible.

You can order your new alarm online today or call 0800 999 0400 at any time.

VAT Exemption

If you have been diagnosed with cancer, or any other long term medical condition, you are eligible for VAT exemption on your new personal alarm. More than 90% of our customers do not have to pay any VAT on their alarms for this reason.

Editor’s Note: This article was updated on 30th September 2021 to reflect current information.

Being physically active is good for us in more ways than one. It is beneficial for our physical and mental health, with some research even suggesting that playing sport can help to prevent dementia.

Exercising regularly also strengthens circulation by working our muscles and heart. Sport pushes us physically, but it has additional benefits too. As you square up against an opponent, battling to better each other and come out on top, you also need to engage your brain. Strategy, endurance, and quick-thinking are important skills for us to maintain as we get older.

Football Sport Prevent Dementia

Can Sport & Exercise Prevent Dementia?

While there is currently no surefire way to prevent dementia, scientists are researching ways for people to reduce their risk of developing the condition. One study in particular followed 2,000 men in Wales for 35 years. It assessed five key healthy behaviours: regular exercise, not smoking, moderate alcohol intake, maintaining a healthy body weight, and eating a healthy diet. Results indicated that frequent exercise was more effective at reducing dementia risk than any of these other factors. In fact, when looking at the findings of several recent studies, exercising regularly appears to reduce the risk of dementia by around 30%.

Irisin Discovery

One of the most promising recent discoveries is a hormone called irisin. The body releases this hormone during exercise. Initially, scientists believed its only role was in the metabolism. However, they quickly discovered that irisin also promotes growth in the hippocampus, a part of the brain which is critical for memory. What’s more, they noticed that people with Alzheimer’s disease had lower levels of irisin in their hippocampus. Therefore, it would seem that increasing your irisin levels by exercising more could help to prevent dementia.

 

Additional Health Benefits of Sport and Exercise

Aside from a reduction in dementia risk, there are lots of reasons to play a sport or exercise regularly.

Exercising in Later Life

Looking to get back into regular exercise or take up a new sport? Trying to find the right activity for you might seem daunting – especially if you have any medical conditions or mobility issues to contend with. Therefore, you should talk to your GP or physiotherapist before starting a new exercise regime. This will not only put your mind at ease but they might also give you advice and tips to support your new active lifestyle.

How to Reduce Your Dementia Risk

As well as frequent exercise, the following habits can also help to reduce your risk of developing dementia.

Healthy Diet

Where possible, try to eat a low-fat diet of fresh fruit and vegetables as well as high-fibre whole grains. Lots of people recommend a Mediterranean style diet high in fruits, vegetables, and oily fish.

This type of diet also shows an association with lower levels of strokes, diabetes type 2 and cardiovascular disease.

Stamp Out Smoking

It’s no secret that smoking does huge damage to our health. But did you know that smokers have a 45% higher risk of developing dementia than non-smokers? However, research suggests that, a few years after quitting,  the risk of dementia in former smokers is close to that of people who have never smoked.

 

It’s Not Just About Taking Part

If you aren’t able to play sport yourself, there is always another way in which sport can help. Cherished sporting memories are also helpful in the fight against dementia. The Sporting Memories Network uses sport memories to engage people with dementia and increase their confidence. The charity runs clubs and workshops nationwide to support people living with dementia, loneliness and depression.

Reliving fond memories from sporting history can have huge benefits for dementia sufferers and their loved ones. These moments activate parts of the brain which deal with memory, whilst also releasing adrenaline, which helps to strengthen the heart.

Final Thoughts on Dementia and Sport

At Lifeline24, we love seeing older people enjoy their independence as much as possible. You don’t need to be winning any medals to reap the rewards of regular exercise. Just make sure that you’re having fun, moving your body and you’re  in good company!

If you’re looking for some exercise ideas, see our top sport and fitness activities for older people.

Editor’s Note: This article was updated on 20 August 2020 to reflect current information.

Originally published September 2015.

Since its creation, the world wide web has changed everything. It’s now an inescapable part of life in the UK, with 91% of all adults using the internet regularly. However, older people have always been the group least likely to use the internet. There are many reasons for this – lots of older people just don’t feel the need to learn how to use it. After all, they’ve managed so far without the web. But with so many benefits to internet use, we want to make the online world as accessible as possible. We understand that internet safety is a concern for lots of older people. If you are unfamiliar with modern technology, you might worry about your privacy and security. This is only natural, but it shouldn’t be an obstacle. That’s why we’ve written this comprehensive internet safety guide for older people.

The Stats

The Office for National Statistics has published in-depth research on internet usage in the UK by age, gender, sex, and location:

If you are unfamiliar with the internet, the thought of getting started might seem daunting. However, there is no reason to let these concerns put you off. In this internet safety guide, we will go through ways to protect yourself online. We’ll also share some tips and tricks to help encourage you to take the leap into the online world.

Internet Safety Guide – Protect Yourself Online

There are so many things you can do with the world wide web at your fingertips. With all these possibilities, it can be hard to know what’s safe and what’s simply too good to be true. Here is a list of things to keep in mind:

Email Security

‘Phishing’ is a common scam that criminals use by sending phoney emails to thousands of people in an attempt to get people’s personal information. The emails look legitimate, as if your own bank or credit card company have sent them to you.

Phishing emails can vary in content and appearance, often making them hard to identify. This is because fraudsters are always changing their ways trying to catch people out. Phishing emails can seem to be from your bank or building society, asking you to confirm a password or update your account. Phishing emails could tell you that you have won lottery or competition; they could contain links or documents attached to them; sometimes they can even be emails claiming to be from someone you know asking for money because they are in trouble or stranded.

So, how can you tell whether an email is genuine or not? Here are some internet safety tips for spotting phishing scams:

Most email providers like Gmail and Yahoo have spam filters that block unwanted emails. However, if you do receive any suspicious emails, contact ActionFraud, the UK’s fraud and cyber-crime reporting centre (0300 123 2040).

Computer scams

This can happen when fraudsters contact you over the telephone, claiming to be from well-known firms with the aim to get you to upload spyware or viruses on to your computer. If they do so they will be able to access any personal information you have stored on your computer. Remember to never respond to a call like this as reputable IT companies never contact customers this way. If you get a suspicious call, hang up straight away. If you are unsure, look up the company that the caller claims to be from. You may well find records of other people being scammed in a similar way.

Passwords

Lots of websites these days require you to create an account and set a password. This is a common method of proving your identity online. Therefore, it’s always important to have strong passwords that are hard for anyone to guess. Different websites will have different password requirements, but as a general rule of thumb you should aim for 8 characters or more. You shouyld also include a combination of upper and lowercase letters, numbers and symbols. Passwords like ‘12345678’, ‘Password123’, ‘[yourname]1956’ or your birthday will make your accounts incredibly easy to hack.

It is also worth using a different password for each website in order to minimise risk. This way, even if somebody guesses one of your passwords, your other accounts remain secure.

We would also advise against writing your passwords down anywhere. If you struggle with memory, there are free and simple password manager apps you can use to keep your passwords safe.  However, if you do feel the need to write any passwords down, make sure you keep them safe away from your computer, ideally in an unmarked notebook. For useful tips on how to create a strong password, visit Microsoft.

Online Shopping

The internet has revolutionised shopping. People can sit in the comfort of their home, sipping on a cup of tea, and with a few clicks they can get their week’s shopping, the latest gadgets, clothes and even flowers delivered right to their doorstep without even having to leave the house.

With the best deals often appearing on the web, online shopping can be a useful way to manage your money. While entering your card details, ensure that no one else can see your screen. It is a good idea to use a credit card for internet transactions, as the card comes with purchase protection from the credit card company. This means they are equally responsible if anything goes wrong with your purchase and can help you get your money back. Your debit card might have some similar protection, but you’ll need to check with your bank to be sure.

Here are Lifeline24’s internet safety tips for securely shopping online:

Social Media

You might think of social media as the realm of the younger generations. However, this is no longer the case. Over 65s are one of the fastest growing groups on social media. You’re never too old to stay in touch with loved ones, reconnect with old friends, and keep up to date with current affairs.

We’ve published a detailed guide to social media for older people, which you can find here. To get you started, here are some internet safety tips specifically for social media:

 

Lifeline’s Top Tips

We’ve covered some key internet safety tips so far, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. The internet holds so many possibilities for older people – far more than we could ever cover in one blog post! Below, we’ve compiled a few of our top tips for those who are just getting started.

Getting started

You don’t need to splash out on the latest devices and gadgets. In fact, pretty much every computer, tablet, and smartphone on the market can access the internet. You will need an internet connection at home. The cost of this can vary, so it is a good idea to shop around and find the best deal for you. uSwitch is a great website to compare offers.

Email

One of the first things to do is set up an email account. Emails are fast, effective way to send messages around the world. You can also receive newsletters, articles, and information about things you are interested in. It’s important to have an email address, as many companies will use this to send you bills, invoices, and other important information. You will also need an email address to sign up to social media sites like Facebook. There are many free email service providers to choose from, such as Gmail, Outlook, Hotmail and Yahoo.

What Next?

Now you know the internet safety essentials, what about staying safe at home? A Lifeline pendant alarm can give you peace of mind and help you carry on living independently. In the event of a fall or other emergency, all you need to do is press the button on your pendant. The alarm system will connect you instantly to our Emergency Response Team, who will assess the situation and send help to you immediately.

For more information on our life-saving service, read our guide to the Lifeline alarm system here or call us on 0800 999 0400.

You can also order your new Lifeline alarm online today.

Editor’s Note: This article was updated on 12 August 2020 to reflect current information.

Our relatives are the most important people around us. They are the people we know the most, the people we see the most and the people we rely on the most. It is a difficult and devastating image to watch relatives become ill, vulnerable or age and it’s our duty to look after them as they struggle through these times. We are all living longer and more and more people are finding themselves in a situation where they need care or, undoubtedly, will need care and this is something that can’t be ignored.

Thinking about caring for relatives isn’t something that comes up until the event happens but it isn’t something we should just push to the back of our minds. There are a lot of factors to consider and difficult conversations to be had, such as wills and care homes, and they must be talked about delicately. Looking ahead with a bit of forward planning will make life much easier, not just for us but for our relatives too, and if we go about it in a calm and considerate way then it won’t be so traumatic when the day comes to put care into place.

The modern world is full of costs and when you are retired, ill or disabled the topic of affordability is a major concern. The population of the UK is getting older and it is paramount that we as a nation and as a society are in a situation where care is accessible and affordable for those who a vulnerable and life reliant on care. Government focus on care seems to be dwindling and with councils losing significant funding it is leaving so many people in a situation unable to afford or access the right care. This predicament has forced many elderly or disabled people to leave their homes to go live with family members, to go into sheltered housing or care homes because it is too dangerous for them to be left alone.

Look Elsewhere for Care

Our hopeful look to the government or local councils for assistance with vulnerable relatives is something that is becoming a lost cause. The elderly and disabled in England have been told that cuts and extra charges to social care services are being enforced. The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) has stated that the spending on care this year in England would cost over £20 billion; which is a notable increase in spending from previous years an emphasis on the growing amount of care that is required.

The ADASS surveyed over 150 councils in England and found that even though the Budget announced an injection of a £1 billion for care, councils would need to make cuts of £800 million. Not only will councils see difficulties but; Chris Hopson, chief executive of NHS Providers, predicted the difficulties in the social care sector would have a knock-on impact on the NHS, which relies on care services to get the elderly and vulnerable out of the hospital.

This growing pandemic of social care cuts is making it harder for people, nearly 700 000 of those reliant on council care are the elderly, to access care and get the help needed. 37.5 % of the elderly in need of care in England is helped by family and friends and with this figure likely to grow over the coming years it is important for us to find the best care solutions for our relatives.

Caring for Relatives

Caring for Our Relatives

When it comes down to choosing a care option for our relatives, there are many factors to consider in choosing the right one.

Care options to think about for our relatives are:

Looking after an elderly relative can have financial and emotional challenges that get placed on you and it is important to remember to also look after yourself. Many people find caring for a relative a burden and don’t always realise the help and tools available, such useful help is Carers Trust and the NHS Guide to Care and Support.

What is the Best Option

When the questions come up regarding care and where our relatives want to be; the answer will quickly be that they stay in their own home. They retain their independence, they are not up-rooted from the home that they love and we can feel that they retain their dignity and are in a comfortable environment that they are familiar to.

Allowing our relatives to stay independent within their own home is the most likely best solution and there are so many options to help them even further. A fantastic service is the meals on wheels service, that brings fully prepared meals to the doorstep and fulfills great peace of mind knowing that our relatives have access to meals.

One of the most troublesome issues that we as loved one’s face when leaving our elderly and vulnerable relatives alone in their own home is, ‘What happens if they need help?’

Luckily there is an answer, personal alarms. Personal alarms are a perfect solution for our elderly relatives to live on their own with access to help with the push of a button. Not to mention the unprecedented peace of mind it provides loved ones knowing those that they care about can access a lifeline when in need of help.

Personal Alarms

Thankfully, there are services, such as Lifeline24, offering personal alarms so that our relatives and ourselves can have the peace of mind for them to stay independent in their own home and have a lifeline to the outside world if they need help.

A personal alarm is the perfect solution for elderly or disabled people living on their own as they allow those who use the alarm to call for assistance if they have an accident or a fall in their home.

personal alram for elderly relative

They are ideal for helping the elderly and vulnerable to feel safe as they remain independent for longer. They work by alerting a 24-hour monitoring centre, who have emergency contact details of friends, family or neighbours available so they can contact them on the user of the alarms behalf to go and help. The monitoring centre can also contact the emergency services if they are required.

Personal alarms are specifically designed to be used in and around a person’s home. The user of the alarm can have the pendant button, which works in tandem with the base unit, on their person at all times and the pendants are waterproof meaning they can be used in the bath or shower which is where most falls and accidents happen.

A personal alarm is simply a simple call button that requires a small push and a then call is automatically sent out via a base unit, that is plugged directly into the telephone landline, when the user of the alarm needs help. At night time, the pendant can be easily worn comfortably on the user’s wrist or can sit next to their bed in reach if needed.

The Lifeline Vi Alarm & MyAmie Pendant

Our personal alarms for the elderly are inexpensive and include no hidden extra charges. After setting up fees you can choose a monthly or yearly plan which is affordable for the 24/7 support we give all year round.

Lifeline personal alarms come in two parts; A base unit that you plug directly into your phone line and a MyAmie Pendant button that can be worn around the wrist or the neck. They are ideal for the elderly, disabled, chronically ill- with diseases such as cancerdiabetes and dementia, or people who just need a little bit of reassurance to remain independent at home.

The alarms have been proven to be effective and they are simple to use. If the user of the alarm needs help, they activate the pendant button they are wearing. An alarm call is then automatically sent out through the base unit and received almost immediately by our 24-hour Response Team.

The Response Team then try to communicate with the alarm user by speaking to them over the base unit’s loudspeaker function and they then arrange help in the form of family, friends, neighbours or the emergency services to go out to the user of the alarm. The user of the alarm then has the confidence and peace of mind that every time they push the pendant button for help; someone will come.

Lifeline personal alarms for elderly people, provide peace of mind to you and your relatives; without you needing to move into an, often un-affordable, care home or buy into expensive care services. We believe that the elderly and disabled should be able to stay in their homes as long as possible and that their home care should be affordable to their loved ones.

Lifeline24’s service would not be what it is without the MyAmie pendant button. This small and discreet pendant is worn on a wrist strap, neck cord or on a belt clip. It functions on the European Social Alarm Frequency (869MHz) which means that it does not interfere with medical equipment such as a pace maker.

The MyAmie pendant button has fantastic features:

If you are interested in personal alarms for elderly people you can find more information, videos and customer testimonials on the Lifeline24 website. You can also Tweet us your thoughts on care home prices @Lifeline24 or write to us in the comments below.

A Final Thought on Caring For Relatives With A Pendant Alarm

With countless cuts and not enough care from the government or councils to keep up with the demand it is falling on family to look after their relatives. Luckily, with such services as a personal alarm; there is that monumental opportunity for our relatives to remain in their own home and be comfortable and safe knowing that help is a push of a button away so that they can continue their day to day activities even gardening.

These devices and services are a lifeline in the growing need for care in a population that is getting older for longer. It can be difficult to come to decisions about caring for our relatives and allowing them to keep their independence is always something that will be one of the top priorities when decided on types of care. Personal alarms certainly do that job, and the peace of mind knowing that even though your relatives might be alone in their home a lifeline is there bringing your relatives one button away from the help they need.

“Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in May 2015 and has been updated to include up-to-date facts regarding current issues.”

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Most of our users qualify for VAT exemption. To qualify, the user must state they have a long term physical or mental impairment which has a negative effect on their day-to-day life. Examples include hypertension or diabetes. To find out more, click here. VAT inclusive set-up fee is £42. The 3 months free offer is based on the saving made on Annual Plan compared to the monthly fee over 12 months. Any discounts are an introductory offer and do not apply after the initial 12 months. Standard price for the Annual Plan is £154 (£184.80 VAT inclusive) and £14.49 (£17.38 VAT inclusive) for the Monthly Plan.

In the last year, a third of councils in England have faced cuts and have also lost funding from the government – which has resulted in councils having to cut spending on social care which provide individuals with important services such as personal alarms.

The central government grant which brought councils £18 Billion for social care was scrapped last year and it has left a major funding gap for councils to try and tackle. The lack of funding to social care will see services being lost all together as these areas, where the elderly are cared for, has already been crushed under growing demand. The impact of these cuts has led to warnings from the NHS as the burden has increased dramatically with more and more older people have needed hospital and emergency care because they do not have the support within their own home.

With social care suffering the most from government cuts, the elderly and vulnerable have been forced to seek out care privately. Since the late 1970’s there has been a remarkable shift to privatisation.  In 1979, 64% of residential and nursing home beds were provided by local authorities or by the NHS – By 2012 it was 6%.

In the case of home care, 95% was directly provided by local authorities as late as 1993; by 2012 this figure was just 11%. This has been accompanied by a growing role for large care companies expanding at the expense of small, family run businesses – five large chains now account for 20% of care supply in England and this figure is expected to rise very quickly now that councils have lost this major grant.

The UK’s population’s life expectancy has grown and will continue to grow with advances in medical technology and treatments. Available care will be become more and more vital as this increase grows and at the moment the UK is on verge of collapse in terms of accessible care.

A study tracking trends in life expectancy found that the care increase is the result of growth in the population of over 65’s that more than wipes out any reductions from expected drops in the incidence of dementia and cardiovascular disease. The study warns that if the” shortage of caregivers and the precarious state” of care are not addressed urgently, many more people on low incomes will be unable to live independently.

This will force elderly and frail residents to turn to family members, who may not be able to accommodate or afford to support them, and it may force people into sheltered accommodation or care homes- where there is a nationwide shortage of affordable homes to go to.

Care home “Top-Up Fees”

Over-complicated and incorrect information from councils has been blamed for people being unable to make the best financial decisions when choosing care options. Often care home “top-up fees” such as paying for bigger rooms, have been incorrectly charged. Such extra expenses can be shocking anyway when families are already paying out large fees for their relatives to stay in care homes.

It’s been revealed by the Local Government Ombudsman that families are paying too much for care, due to privatisation of some care services and local authorities having to charge for their services. With councils having to scrap some social care services or begin charging for them, people were not offered an affordable option and fees being incorrectly charged in some cases. The Local Government Ombudsman stated that within a year there was nearly a 20% increase in complaints about social care of which nearly 60% was upheld.

Personal Alarm – A Quick Fix

Lifeline Personal AlarmMore and more people are wanting to stay in their own home longer and with cuts to domicile care making it hard for people and their loved ones to have the peace of mind that they can be safe without having to move.

A personal alarm is the perfect solution for elderly or disabled people living on their own as they allow those who use the alarm to call for assistance if they have an accident or a fall in their home.

They are ideal for helping the elderly and vulnerable to feel safe as they remain independent for longer. They work by alerting a 24-hour monitoring centre, who have emergency contact details of friends, family or neighbours available so they can contact them on the user of the alarms behalf to go and help. The monitoring centre can also contact the emergency services if they are required.

Personal alarms are specifically designed to be used in and around a person’s home. The user of the alarm can have the pendant button, which works in tandem with the base unit, on their person at all times and the pendants are waterproof meaning they can be used in the bath or shower.

It is a simple call button that requires a small push and a call is automatically sent out when the user of the alarm needs help. At night time the pendant can be easily worn comfortably on the user’s wrist or sit next their bed if needed.

Added Benefits of a Personal Alarm

Choosing an Inexpensive Personal Alarm

  1. Think about what type of equipment you require.
  2. Take the time to ask all relevant questions and understand the personal alarm.
  3. You might need a keysafe which works great with a personal alarm just in case any called to your home can’t gain access. A police-approved keysafe is always highly recommended.
  4. Always make sure to check the company you consider is a member of the TSA (Telecare Services Association).

Lifeline Personal Alarms

Our personal alarms for the elderly are inexpensive and include no hidden extra charges. After setting up fees you can choose a monthly or yearly plan that is affordable for the 24/7 support we give all year round.

Lifeline personal alarms come in two parts; A base unit that you plug directly into your phone line and a MyAmie pendant button that can be worn around the wrist or the neck. They are ideal for the elderly, disabled, chronically ill- with diseases such as cancer, diabetes and dementia, or people who just need a little bit of reassurance to remain independent at home.

Lifeline personal alarms have been proven to be effective and they are simple to use. If the user of the alarm needs help, they activate the pendant button they are wearing. An alarm call is then automatically sent out through the base unit and received almost immediately by our 24-hour Response Team. The Response Team then try to communicate with the alarm user by speaking to them over the base unit’s loudspeaker function and they then arrange help in the form of family, friends, neighbours or the emergency services to go out to the user of the alarm. The user of the alarm then has the confidence and peace of mind that every time they push the pendant button for help; someone will come.

Lifeline personal alarms for elderly people, provide peace of mind to you and your relatives; without you needing to move into an, often un-affordable, care home or buy into expensive care services. We believe that the elderly and disabled should be able to stay in their homes as long as possible and that their home care should be affordable to their loved ones.

If you are interested in personal alarms for elderly people you can find more information, videos and customer testimonials on the Lifeline24 website. You can also Tweet us your thoughts on care home prices @Lifeline24 or write to us in the comments below.

The MyAmie Pendant for The Personal Alarm

Lifeline24’s service would not be what it is without the MyAmie pendant button. This small and discreet pendant is worn on a wrist strap, neck cord or on a belt clip. It functions on the European Social Alarm Frequency (869MHz) which means that it does not interfere with medical equipment such as a pace maker.

The MyAmie pendant button has fantastic features:

 A Final Thought on Personal Alarms

Looking after ourselves as we get older is extremely important and so is remaining independent in our homes for as long as possible. Personal alarms are the perfect solution; not only do they allow elderly and disabled people to feel comfortable and safe but they also bring peace of mind to loved ones knowing those that they care about can access a lifeline when in need of help.

The modern world is full of costs and when you are retired, ill or disabled the topic of affordability is a major concern. Government focus on care seems to be dwindling and with councils losing significant funding it is leaving so many people in a situation unable to afford or access the right care. This predicament has forced many elderly or disabled people to leave their homes to go live with family members, to go into sheltered housing or care homes because it is too dangerous for them to be left alone.

The population of the UK is getting older and it is paramount that we as a nation and as a society are in a situation where care is accessible and affordable for those who a vulnerable and life-reliant on care.

In 1975, 14% of the population were 65-years-old or older. Today, in 2017, that figure is 18% and by 2045 that figure will be well over 25% of the population of the UK who will be over the age of 65. A study in The Lancet has predicted that the number of over 65 year olds requiring some form of care due to age-related disability could reach 2.8 million by 2025 in England and Wales – this figure is 25 per cent more than in 2015.

Thankfully, there are services, such as Lifeline24 offering inexpensive personal alarms, so that those who need the peace of mind to stay independent in their own home can have a lifeline to the outside world when they need help.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in May 2015 and has been updated to include up-to-date facts regarding current issues.

Monthly Plan

£12.49*per month
+ £35 one-off setup fee


Monthly Plan

*VAT inclusive price of £14.99 applies if you do not qualify for VAT exemption

Annual Plan

£119* With 3 months Free
+ £35 one-off setup fee

SPECIAL OFFER!
12 months for the price of 9


Annual Plan

*VAT inclusive price of £142.80 applies if you do not qualify for VAT exemption

Most of our users qualify for VAT exemption. To qualify, the user must state they have a long term physical or mental impairment which has a negative effect on their day-to-day life. Examples include hypertension or diabetes. To find out more, click here. VAT inclusive set-up fee is £42. The 3 months free offer is based on the saving made on Annual Plan compared to the monthly fee over 12 months. Any discounts are an introductory offer and do not apply after the initial 12 months. Standard price for the Annual Plan is £154 (£184.80 VAT inclusive) and £14.49 (£17.38 VAT inclusive) for the Monthly Plan.

Want to order your alarm or have a question? Get in touch!